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BOOK REVIEW: The Fungus by Harry Adam Knight

The Fungus is a romp of a horror story, mixing black-humour with a classic Promethean horror motif of science run amok. Part of Valancourt Book’s revamp of 1970s and 80s creature horror, The Fungus delivers on the nostalgia and a wickedly grotesque monster, well, mutated fungi really, but they aren’t without animation. The story is packed with action, gross-out moments and good old, fashioned 1980s sex scenes, a la Eric Van Lustbader.

A pesky scientists whose trying to solve world hunger, a female no less (right on, man, er I mean, woman), unwittingly creates an enzyme that when it is released into the atmosphere causes all the fungi it touches to mutate. As fungi are quite literally everywhere, an athlete’s foot or itchy yeast infection become a death sentence (tut, roll eyes – meddling women! Whatever next, a woman Prime Minister? Oh, wait Margaret Thatcher is PM then and Theresa May – at least at the time of writing – is now – poignant contemporary parallel anyone?). The fungus spreads quickly (like a Bros song), knocking out London first and then quickly moving across the rest of the country, leaving the UK isolated in a mire of it’s own making (poignant contemporary parallel anyone?).

Read the full review on Storgy.com.

By |2020-04-22T14:38:34+01:00April 22nd, 2020|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Book Review: Anno Dracula – One Thousand Monsters by Kim Newman

More Gothic and Victorian literary intertextuality that you can shake a wooden stake at. Slicker than a tanto blade after seppuku with only faintly marred with staccato transitions into action scenes. So sharp it might cut itself with its own cleverness. (Read the full review here.)

By |2020-04-22T14:37:07+01:00April 22nd, 2020|Book Reviews|0 Comments

Book Review: The Last Dog on Earth by Adrian J Walker

I haven’t enjoyed a book quite as much as this in a long time. A post-apocalyptic dystopian ripping yarn, which is both funny and moving in equal measure. A reflection on what might happen if the more intolerant, nationalistic elements of the Bretix movement become amplified. Nothing particularly new in the post-apocalyptic vision, however, the richly drawn characters enable Adrian J Walker to use the tropes of the genre to say something engaging and profound about our current situation, and more so about our humanity. Read the full review here…

By |2020-04-22T14:47:59+01:00January 2nd, 2019|Uncategorized|0 Comments

How It Ends

Netflix tries its hand at funding an end of the world movie, with some top dollar actors. And largely its good. While the script plays out some predictable tropes, such as the father-in-law-to-be relationship, got to get from here to way over there journey, whilst everything is falling apart and people screw each other over – it handles them professionally, without excessive cheese-whiz and it doesn’t feel the need to go for an ending that wraps everything up in a neat little bow… (full review here).

By |2020-04-22T14:52:24+01:00July 12th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments